Frrrrrrrriday!!!! The Coffee Break 18 Nov 2016.

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Well here we are folks, Friday – TGIF, right? While you are getting ready for the weekend, let us talk about the phenomenon of Fridays; a note before we go on this will be a simple theory-based discussion on the concept of: “thank god it’s Friday.”

 

Usually workers dread Mondays and love Fridays – the end of the work week and the beginning of a short period of rest and respite (lousy family duties and mandatory outings not withstanding). Though it is nice to see workers get excited for the weekends, I often wonder why is it that workers hate work so much to the point that they always think of time off rather than a healthy mixture of interest for the workplace and enjoyment of time off – is it because they work too many hours for too little pay? Perhaps the workforce feels trapped in a cycle – an endless cycle of work – that prevents them from pursuing their interests outside of work?

 

Naturally you will get some people who just do not want to work at all and want everything, this fact is unavoidable and we see it in modern society. Yet blaming the rest of the work force for the same attitude is like blaming voters of a particular party for the ills of a nation and painting them all with the same brush; not only is it unfair, it is outright degrading as you are declaring that they are incapable of rational thought.

 

One has to look at how the working hours are to get a better picture of what is going on; naturally people want to work in order to make a living (and a better living than living off of government subsidies). Yet sometimes the workers need time off; more time off isn’t a bad thing as while a business is in the slow season they can afford to allow their workers to relax a bit more. Sure the workers may not be earning as much as when they were in peak season, but time is just as valuable as currency.

 

Yet blaming employers entirely isn’t really productive as the workers are also responsible for their current problems. Today we see constant messages of consumption, and while owning interesting and nice things should not be frowned upon there comes a time and place to take stock of what one has and settle with what they have – a sort of: “I don’t need the latest, and my machine is only a couple of years old – good enough.” There are plenty of people out there who spend beyond their means, who strive to live the life of the aristocracy via owning massive estates and horses – they themselves, however, lack the means to achieve said goals. Instead these people live from paycheck to paycheck, without giving a thought into how they are going to grow their earnings using passive income sources – they spend and spend and end up with a pile of bills and a storage locker stuffed full of useless junk.

 

The worker who wants more will end up working more as they strive to achieve a certain economic status; good for some if their goals are realistic, but bad for others if their goals are far beyond their physical and mental capabilities. Sure pushing yourself has its advantages, but have you ever observed a racing horse pushed past its breaking point? The poor beast of burden collapses and the rider is thrown from the saddle; not even the mighty stallion can survive being forced to do something that it cannot achieve ie: the delivery of speed and power instantly and constantly.

 

Sometimes it is best to wait for a sale to happen to buy that new laptop, or look for a cheaper brand of car instead of the luxury models. These companies care little if you default on your house payments, car payments, or rent – they will always get their money, even if it puts you on the street. Why put yourself in that kind of situation where you are forced to work double overtime and live out of your car (if the banks haven’t taken that away yet) – why make life miserable when you had a stable base to begin with? Progress for most must come at a steady pace – rush things and it runs a very high risk of collapse, take too long and you might miss opportunity. Sure I get it, you are impatient for success, but sometimes success wants to take its time, and rushing it will be like rushing into marriage – it ends in a divorce and a lengthy custody battle for the kids (if any).

 

Old video games are just as enjoyable as new ones; hell I am still playing Skyrim all these years later and am not planning on getting the special edition anytime soon – plenty of mods for basic Skyrim to dig through, and I only just installed Script Extender. There is little to no need to feed the useless practice of pre-orders and day one purchases where you will be paying out the rear end for games you may not even like in the end – all because some executive at E3 presented a flashy presentation and got you throwing your hard-earned money (the money you had to force yourself to wake up at 6am and fight through traffic to get, remember?) at them for the product you haven’t even tested or read reviews on.

 

Employers need to give their workers more time off, and workers need to focus on quality of goods rather than quantity – this way the workers will always have enough money, and the employers will have healthy and productive employees who will stick around longer thanks to a well-organized and managed company.

 

Feel free to check out the Patreon if you wish to pledge support; thanks for reading and we shall see you next time.

 

Patreon page:

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About thoughtsandtopics

Creating articles related to the games industry and military news.

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